The Tuskegee Syphilis Study

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study
Title The Tuskegee Syphilis Study PDF eBook
Author Fred D. Gray
Publisher NewSouth Books
Pages 180
Release 2013-01-01
Genre History
ISBN 1603063099

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In 1932, the U.S. Public Health Service recruited 623 African American men from Macon County, Alabama, for a study of "the effects of untreated syphilis in the Negro male." For the next 40 years -- even after the development of penicillin, the cure for syphilis -- these men were denied medical care for this potentially fatal disease. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study was exposed in 1972, and in 1975 the government settled a lawsuit but stopped short of admitting wrongdoing. In 1997, President Bill Clinton welcomed five of the Study survivors to the White House and, on behalf of the nation, officially apologized for an experiment he described as wrongful and racist. In this book, the attorney for the men, Fred D. Gray, describes the background of the Study, the investigation and the lawsuit, the events leading up to the Presidential apology, and the ongoing efforts to see that out of this painful and tragic episode of American history comes lasting good.

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study
Title The Tuskegee Syphilis Study PDF eBook
Author
Publisher
Pages
Release 2004
Genre African American men
ISBN

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Tuskegee Syphilis Study

Tuskegee Syphilis Study
Title Tuskegee Syphilis Study PDF eBook
Author
Publisher
Pages
Release 1996
Genre African American men
ISBN

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Bad Blood

Bad Blood
Title Bad Blood PDF eBook
Author James H. Jones
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Pages 324
Release 1993
Genre Health & Fitness
ISBN 0029166764

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The modern classic of race and medicine updated with an additional chapter on the Tuskegee experiment's legacy in the age of AIDS.

Tuskegee's Truths

Tuskegee's Truths
Title Tuskegee's Truths PDF eBook
Author Susan M. Reverby
Publisher UNC Press Books
Pages 651
Release 2012-12-01
Genre Medical
ISBN 1469608723

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Between 1932 and 1972, approximately six hundred African American men in Alabama served as unwitting guinea pigs in what is now considered one of the worst examples of arrogance, racism, and duplicity in American medical research--the Tuskegee syphilis study. Told they were being treated for "bad blood," the nearly four hundred men with late-stage syphilis and two hundred disease-free men who served as controls were kept away from appropriate treatment and plied instead with placebos, nursing visits, and the promise of decent burials. Despite the publication of more than a dozen reports in respected medical and public health journals, the study continued for forty years, until extensive media coverage finally brought the experiment to wider public knowledge and forced its end. This edited volume gathers articles, contemporary newspaper accounts, selections from reports and letters, reconsiderations of the study by many of its principal actors, and works of fiction, drama, and poetry to tell the Tuskegee story as never before. Together, these pieces illuminate the ethical issues at play from a remarkable breadth of perspectives and offer an unparalleled look at how the study has been understood over time.

Examining Tuskegee

Examining Tuskegee
Title Examining Tuskegee PDF eBook
Author Susan M. Reverby
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
Pages 413
Release 2009-11-01
Genre Social Science
ISBN 0807898678

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The forty-year Tuskegee Syphilis Study, which took place in and around Tuskegee, Alabama, from the 1930s through the 1970s, has become a profound metaphor for medical racism, government malfeasance, and physician arrogance. Susan M. Reverby's Examining Tuskegee is a comprehensive analysis of the notorious study of untreated syphilis among African American men, who were told by U.S. Public Health Service doctors that they were being treated, not just watched, for their late-stage syphilis. With rigorous clarity, Reverby investigates the study and its aftermath from multiple perspectives and illuminates the reasons for its continued power and resonance in our collective memory.

Medical Apartheid

Medical Apartheid
Title Medical Apartheid PDF eBook
Author Harriet A. Washington
Publisher Vintage
Pages 530
Release 2008-01-08
Genre History
ISBN 076791547X

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NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER • The first full history of Black America’s shocking mistreatment as unwilling and unwitting experimental subjects at the hands of the medical establishment. No one concerned with issues of public health and racial justice can afford not to read this masterful book. "[Washington] has unearthed a shocking amount of information and shaped it into a riveting, carefully documented book." —New York Times From the era of slavery to the present day, starting with the earliest encounters between Black Americans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, Medical Apartheid details the ways both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledge—a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It reveals how Blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of Blacks. Shocking new details about the government’s notorious Tuskegee experiment are revealed, as are similar, less-well-known medical atrocities conducted by the government, the armed forces, prisons, and private institutions. The product of years of prodigious research into medical journals and experimental reports long undisturbed, Medical Apartheid reveals the hidden underbelly of scientific research and makes possible, for the first time, an understanding of the roots of the African American health deficit. At last, it provides the fullest possible context for comprehending the behavioral fallout that has caused Black Americans to view researchers—and indeed the whole medical establishment—with such deep distrust.